Discovered Evidence Of Neanderthal Cannibalism In Northern Europe
Jul13

Discovered Evidence Of Neanderthal Cannibalism In Northern Europe

The Neanderthals displayed great variability in their behaviour and one of the aspects in which this becomes clear is their relationship with the dead. There is evidence on different sites (e.g. Chapelle-aux-Saints in France, and Sima de las Palomas on the Iberian Peninsula) that the Neanderthals buried the dead. Yet other sites show that the Neanderthals ate the meat and broke the bones of their fellow Neanderthals for food. Evidence...

Read More
Archaeology Suggests No Direct Link Between Climate Change And Early Human Innovation
Jul08

Archaeology Suggests No Direct Link Between Climate Change And Early Human Innovation

Environmental records obtained from archaeological sites suggest climate may not have been directly linked to cultural and technological innovations of Middle Stone Age humans in southern Africa, according to a study published July 6, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patrick Roberts from the University of Oxford, UK, and colleagues. The Middle Stone Age marked a period of dramatic change amongst early humans in southern...

Read More
Medieval weapon-making foundry discovered on shore of Lake Baikal
Jul05

Medieval weapon-making foundry discovered on shore of Lake Baikal

Furnaces for ‘advanced’ metal production found under dirt track used by summer tourists. Archeologists walking to a beauty spot on Lake Baikal chanced across the ‘unique’ ancient furnaces after noticing slag and clay coating on a rough road used by tourists to access the shoreline. Tests with geophysical equipment confirmed the presence of underground structures. Two furnaces made of stone were unearthed,...

Read More
Fire Discovery Sheds New Light On ‘Hobbit’ Demise
Jul03

Fire Discovery Sheds New Light On ‘Hobbit’ Demise

Crucial new evidence has revealed modern humans (Homo sapiens) were likely using fire at Liang Bua 41,000 years ago, narrowing the time gap between the last hobbits (Homo floresiensis) and the first modern humans at this site on the Indonesian island of Flores. The research, led by the University of Wollongong Australia (UOW) and Indonesia’s National Research Centre for Archaeology and published in the Journal of Archaeological...

Read More
Researchers Find Highland East Asian Origin For Prehistoric Himalayan Populations
Jun25

Researchers Find Highland East Asian Origin For Prehistoric Himalayan Populations

In a collaborative study by the University of Oklahoma, University of Chicago, University of California, Merced, and Uppsala University, researchers conduct the first ancient DNA investigation of the Himalayan arc, generating genomic data for eight individuals ranging in time from the earliest known human settlements to the establishment of the Tibetan Empire. The findings demonstrate that the genetic make-up of high-altitude...

Read More
Top

Pin It on Pinterest